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Table 1 Dependent variables considered in this study and their description, as well as the model species considered for each of the season (breeding: 15th April to 15th July, post-breeding migration: 16th July to 15th October and wintering: 15th November to 15th February) that were included in the statistical analyses (all = every sampled bird of all species)

From: Individual and demographic responses of a marsh bird assemblage to habitat loss and subsequent restoration

Dependent variableDescriptionBreeding speciesPost-breeding migratory speciesWintering species
Relative abundanceSampled birds (n)/ringing days (n)All, Acrocephalus scirpaceusa,c, Cettia cettia,eAll, Acrocephalus schoenobaenusa,c, Acrocephalus scirpaceusa,c, Phylloscopus trochilusb,cAll, Cettia cettia,e, Emberiza schoeniclusa,d, Phylloscopus collybitab,d
Species richnessSampled species (n)/ringing days (n)AllAllAll
Proportion of juvenile birds1[Juvenile birds (n)/adult birds (n)]/ringing days (n)Acrocephalus scripaceusa,c, Cettia cettia,eAcrocephalus schoenobaenusa c, Acrocephalus scirpaceusa c, Phylloscopus trochilusb cCettia cettia,e, Emberiza schoeniclus,a,d, Phylloscopus collybitab,d
Sex ratio[Males (n)/females (n)]/ringing days (n)Acrocephalus scripaceusa.c, Cettia cettia,eNone2Cettia cettia,e, Emberiza schoeniclusa,d
Subcutaneous fatAverage fat score of the sampled birds/ringing days (n)Acrocephalus scripaceusa,c, Cettia cettia,eAcrocephalus schoenobaenusa,c, Acrocephalus scirpaceus, Phylloscopus trochilusb,cCettia cettia,e, Emberiza schoeniclusa,d, Phylloscopus collybitab,d
Body condition[Average values of residuals of weight (g)/length of third primary feather (mm)]/ringing days (n)Acrocephalus scripaceusa,c, Cettia cettia,eAcrocephalus schoenobaenusa,c, Acrocephalus scirpaceusa,c, Phylloscopus trochilusb,cCettia cettia,e, Emberiza schoeniclusa,d, Phylloscopus collybitab,d
  1. areedbed specialist; bhabitat generalist; clong-distance migrant; dshort-distance migrant; esedentary
  2. 1 During breeding season, this parameter was considered as an index of breeding success. 2 Differences in sex determination cannot be addressed by observational procedures for the most common migratory species at the study area (Svensson 1992; Jenni and Winkler 1994)